📜 Plans vs. Planning

Plans are worthless, but planning is everything. — Dwight Eisenhower Quote Investigator The details of a plan which was designed years in advance are often incorrect, but the planning process demands the thorough exploration of options and contingences. The knowledge gained during this probing is crucial to the selection of appropriate actions as future events unfold.

April 29, 2024 · 1 min · 56 words

🏞 What I’ve Learned About Venture Funding | Bothsides of the Table

VC funding. Our perspectives on the topic wax and wane […] Source: What I’ve Learned About Venture Funding | Bothsides of the Table

August 29, 2015 · 1 min · 23 words

📜 Try to learn something about everything and everything about

Try to learn something about everything and everything about something. Thomas Henry Huxley (via Donald Knuth )

February 22, 2015 · 1 min · 17 words

🏞 Questions vs. Answers

{width=“789” height=“1100” srcset="/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/tumblr_myu2n8D3J21qz82meo1_1280.jpg 789w, /wp-content/uploads/2014/01/tumblr_myu2n8D3J21qz82meo1_1280-215x300.jpg 215w, /wp-content/uploads/2014/01/tumblr_myu2n8D3J21qz82meo1_1280-734x1024.jpg 734w" sizes="(max-width: 789px) 100vw, 789px"} Is it better to have lots of “questions” or to be full of “answers”? See the full comic strip @ A DAY AT THE PARK | Kostas Kiriakakis

January 3, 2014 · 1 min · 40 words

🏞 (image)

You push at the boundary for a few years… Until one day, the boundary gives way… And, that dent you’ve made is called a Ph.D… So, don’t forget the bigger picture: Keep pushing. (via What are the main differences between a Masters and a PhD in computer science? – Quora )

December 19, 2012 · 1 min · 51 words

🔗 Study Hacks » You Know What You Write: The Textbook Method for Ultra-Learning

Study Hacks » You Know What You Write: The Textbook Method for Ultra-Learning In two cases I spent roughly the same amount of time trying to learn new knowledge. In one case, I efficiently mastered a new area, while in another, I ended up frustrated. The comparison highlights the power of a simple act: describing and organizing information in your own words.

August 26, 2012 · 1 min · 62 words

🔗 How to call bullshit on a guru « Scott Berkun

How to call bullshit on a guru « Scott Berkun Do… Ask “have you done this yourself?” Ask “How do you know what you know?” Ask “When is the theory you are advocating wrong?” Look for admissions of mistakes and failures. Ask “Why do so many people fail at this?” Don’t… One factual error doesn’t dismiss a theory or a person. Use an expert as your negative stepping stone. Demand instant satisfaction....

March 16, 2012 · 1 min · 72 words

📜 Hanlon’s razor

Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity. — Robert J. Hanlon in Hanlon’s razor Some variations: Never attribute to malice that which can be explained by ignorance.

April 1, 2009 · 1 min · 31 words