📺 Clitics: “there’dn’t’ve”

clitic (plural clitics) (linguistics) A morpheme that functions like a word, but never appears as an independent word, instead being always attached to a following or preceding word (or, in some cases, within a surrounding word). e.g. It’s, should’ve, shouldn’t’ve. There are 2 reasons [for why/when clitics can be applied] Syntatic Gap — A clitic implies another word shoud follow e.g. “Who do you think you’re _____?” Stress patterns — These forms are generaly unsrtesse or week....

December 19, 2023 · 1 min · 96 words

🔗 The Elements of Style

The Elements of Style (via jslint_com – Yahoo Groups ) According to Wikipedia: The Elements of Style (1918), by William Strunk, Jr. and E. B. White, is a prescriptive American English writing style guide comprising eight “elementary rules of usage”, ten “elementary principles of composition”, “a few matters of form”, a list of forty-nine “words and expressions commonly misused”, and a list of fifty-seven “words often misspelled”.

December 9, 2013 · 1 min · 67 words

🏞 hyphen vs. n-dash vs. m-dash

[hyphen](http://thewritepractice.com/create-your-own-words-and-other-uses-of-the-hyphen/) = connect things to be used as one word/unit [n-dash](http://thewritepractice.com/whats-an-en-dash-and-how-to-use-it-correctly/) = indicates a range, as in: X--Y (from x to y) [m-dash](http://thewritepractice.com/what-the-heck-is-an-em-dash/) = break in narration, a short aside

December 5, 2013 · 1 min · 30 words

📜 An apostrophe is the difference between a business that knows its shit

An apostrophe is the difference between a business that knows its shit and a business that knows it’s shit Sam Tanner (@sam_tanner)

August 19, 2011 · 1 min · 22 words