🔗 The differences in British and American spelling

The differences in British and American spelling - Oxford International English Schools The main difference is that British English keeps the spelling of words it has absorbed from other languages, mainly French and German. Whilst American English spellings are based mostly on how the word sounds when it is spoken. Follow the link for more details on typical differences in nouns, verbs, adverbs, etc.

April 22, 2024 · 1 min · 64 words

📺 Clitics: “there’dn’t’ve”

clitic (plural clitics) (linguistics) A morpheme that functions like a word, but never appears as an independent word, instead being always attached to a following or preceding word (or, in some cases, within a surrounding word). e.g. It’s, should’ve, shouldn’t’ve. There are 2 reasons [for why/when clitics can be applied] Syntatic Gap — A clitic implies another word shoud follow e.g. “Who do you think you’re _____?” Stress patterns — These forms are generaly unsrtesse or week....

December 19, 2023 · 1 min · 96 words

🔗 Check Up, Checkup or Check-Up - Which One to Use?

Check Up, Checkup or Check-Up - Which One to Use? Checkup: When it’s a single word like this, it’s a noun to describe an appointment. “I have a checkup at the dentist later this month.” Check-up: Add in the hyphen, and it becomes a phrasal adjective meant to describe the type of appointment or something. “My check-up appointment is at two o’clock, Thursday.” Check up: If used as two individual words, you’ve got yourself a verb to describe what you’re doing, aka a phrasal verb....

November 2, 2023 · 1 min · 100 words

🔗 The Elements of Style

The Elements of Style (via jslint_com – Yahoo Groups ) According to Wikipedia: The Elements of Style (1918), by William Strunk, Jr. and E. B. White, is a prescriptive American English writing style guide comprising eight “elementary rules of usage”, ten “elementary principles of composition”, “a few matters of form”, a list of forty-nine “words and expressions commonly misused”, and a list of fifty-seven “words often misspelled”.

December 9, 2013 · 1 min · 67 words

📜 An apostrophe is the difference between a business that knows its shit

An apostrophe is the difference between a business that knows its shit and a business that knows it’s shit Sam Tanner (@sam_tanner)

August 19, 2011 · 1 min · 22 words